We are sponsoring Nodevember and have a free ticket to give away!

Nodevember will be held in in Nashville, Tennessee on November 14 and 15, 2015. It will feature talks on JavaScript and Node.js.

The event's organizers William Golden, Jason Myers, and Kevin Old, have succeeded in attracting many high profile speakers that will talk about a wide range of topics. Here's an overview:


Speaker Talk
Speaker Douglas Crockford, Senior Architect, PayPal Keynote
Speaker Yehuda Katz, Founder, Tilde Inc. Keynote
Speaker Soledad Penadés, Mozilla Guest Speaker
Speaker Ed Finkler, Founder, OSMI. Guest Speaker
Speaker Laurie Voss, npm, Inc. Guest Speaker
Speaker Guillermo Rauch, Automattic Guest Speaker
Speaker Kyle Simpson, MakerSquare Guest Speaker
Speaker Jed Watson, The Think Mill Guest Speaker
Speaker Rey Bango, Microsoft Guest Speaker
Speaker Aimee Knight, Javascript Jabber Guest Speaker
Speaker Daniel Alan Miller, RethinkDB Guest Speaker
Speaker Chris Williams, Maker of Improbable Things Guest Speaker
Speaker Wyatt Preul, Walmart Labs Guest Speaker
Speaker Patrick Mueller, NodeSource Guest Speaker
Speaker Michael Jackson, ReactJS Training Guest Speaker
Speaker Henrik Joreteg, Human Javascript Guest Speaker
Speaker Bryan Hunter, Firefly Logic What every Node.js developer should know about Elixir
Speaker Brian Mann, Cypress.io Testing, the way it should be.
Speaker Tim Griesser, knex / bookshelf Redux: Simplifying Application State in JavaScript
Speaker Ben Ilegbodu, Eventbrite Sugar & Spice and everything nice about ES6
Speaker Rebecca Turner, npm, Inc. Into the npm installer – how it works and where it's complex
Speaker Donovan Buck, BrandExtract These Bots are Made for Walkin'
Speaker Nicholas Young, Original Machine Callback-less Asynchrony: ES6, Generators, and the next wave of JavaScript development.
Speaker Dave Thompson, CA Technologies You won't believe these 10 weird tricks that React developers near you are using to create reusable components!
Speaker Kelly King, Twitter Board Game JS
Speaker Adam Miskiewicz, Chalk + Chisel React Native in Production
Speaker Robert DeLuca, The Frontside Accessibility Debt
Speaker Jonathan Boston, Cicayda ClojureScript Made Easy
Speaker Adam Baldwin, &yet Node.js security experiments: A trip back in time.
Speaker Aria Stewart, npm, Inc Nuts and Bolts of Internationalization
Speaker Will Klein, Rally Software Scaling Best Practices with Syntax Trees
Speaker Hunter Loftis, Heroku Don't Make Me Refresh!
Speaker Tian Davis, Respoke WebRTC: Unicorns, Narwhals and The Real-Time Web
Speaker Damian Schenkelman, Auth0 The dirty secrets of building large, highly available, scalable HTTP APIs
Speaker Jonathan Creamer, Lonely Planet Advanced WebPack
Speaker Kyle Mathews, RelateRocket GraphQL and Relay
Speaker David Neal, LeanKit Cross-Platform Desktop Apps with Electron
Speaker Jon Beebe, Ramsey Solutions Native JavaScript
Speaker Max Beizer, Heroku Arisen from the Ashes: Phoenix.js and Websockets
Speaker Jordan Kasper, StrongLoop Introduction to Testing Node.js
Speaker Jeff Barczewski, CodeWinds Building simple Node.js microservices using Hapi or Redis
Speaker Jorge Rodriguez, Math for Game Developers Intuitive 3D Math Crash Course
Speaker Mike Nitchie, Titania Software Taking Your Web Apps Offline
Speaker Michael Chan, Planning Center Online Styling React Component in JavaScript
Speaker Chris Keathley, Carbon Five Telling stories with data visualization and D3.
Speaker Kassandra Perch, Bocoup The communal upbringing of a Nodebotanist: how community can make or break your career.
Speaker Scott Southworth, HCA Reactive Composition: TodoMVC Tutorial/Lab
Speaker Parris Khachi, Eventbrite Text, yea, just render it, whatever…
Speaker Derick Bailey, Muted Solutions, LLC A Telegraph To The Future Of Web Applications
Speaker Stacey Mulcahy, Microsoft Exploring the Physical World with Node
Speaker Jacques Woodcock, Tandum Username and Passwords are dead. Mobile ALL the thingz.

Transloadit :revolving_hearts: Node.js

Transloadit is the world's most versatile file uploading and processing service. Back in 2008, we had a vision for a highly available and distributed back-end that would be able to convert everything in parallel - for instance, extracting 80 thumbnails from a video at once. We were playing with different bits of technology, but it often felt like we were using the wrong tools for the job :hammer:

On November 8, 2009, Ryan Dahl gave his first presentation on Node.js at JSConf and we recognized that this would be a great fit for building the Transloadit we had in mind. We started building the first version of our API, but threw it in the garbage bin. Node 0.1.28 was flaky and we had written something that was hard to test.

Somewhat frustrated, we went back to the drawing board. We decided that it was time to get our act together. This meant getting both our API and Node.js to a better place. We landed our first patch in August 2009, and many others would follow. Most of which by our alumni felixge and skomski.

Today, we are the company that has been running Node.js in production the longest. This also means we had to invent a few wheels. With those wheels, we have helped to put the world in motion, most notably through node-mysql, node-formidable, and node-retry.

These Node modules have now become industry standards for dealing with MySQL, file uploads, and networked/unreliable systems. Together, they have been downloaded 3,732,291 times just last month, and they are among the top 0.03% most depended-upon packages in the Node ecosystem.

Great. But what have you written for me lately?

Well, our latest significant open source project is tus. tus is our most ambitious open source project yet: its goal is to change how the world does file uploading.


"tus" is an open standard for resumable file uploads that was started by Transloadit, and collaborated on by employees at Google, Yahoo, the director of engineering at Vimeo, an author of HTTP/1.1, the creator of ZeroMQ, and anyone with a GitHub account and an interest in solving the problem of unreliable file uploads for good.

At the core of tus is a Markdown document describing how resumable file uploads should work. Around that, there are officially maintained implementations for a growing number of platforms, including JS, iOS, Go, Android. There also are many community maintained implementations. tus is a layer on top of HTTP so using one of these implementations, it's easy to deploy in nearly any existing environment. Not that we'd recommend it - but you could write a tus server as a Wordpress plugin.

With the release of tus 1.0 around the corner, we are calling for a final round of feedback. To make sure people know about tus and get a last chance to chime in, we're raising tus awareness by handing out free tus.io swag at conferences such as Nodevember:

tus.io hoodie wow

The Golden Ticket :sparkles:

So what does the free ticket to November include?

  • Free admission (saving you $250)
  • Keynotes, sessions, tutorials
  • Breakfast and lunch each day
  • After party
  • Much more!

How to Win :trophy:

If you're near Nashville during the weekend of November 14 and 15, and would like to win free admission to Nodevember, just let us know on Twitter and you're already competing in our raffle. Done.

There are also a few, optional, ways to increase your likelihood of winning, as the raffle is weighted. Since we are looking to spread the word about tus and Transloadit, we will reward you with cumulative boosts of gratitude if you help us with that:

  1. Ask for the ticket on Twitter: 1
  2. Twitter followers: +1
  3. People who tweet nice things about (t)us: +1
  4. Transloadit's paying customers: +1

This way anybody is able to triple - and our customers are able to quadruple - their chances of winning.

Let us know if you would like to partake in the raffle before November 1st. May the luckiest win! :smile:

If you are looking to organize a conference or hackathon and are still looking for sponsors, shoot an email to hello@transloadit.com, we are always happy to help!

Update - The lucky developer to win the free tickets was Sam Rose!